Stories

We are constantly in awe of our vendors’ stories. They are the reasons we do what we do. We feel so fortunate to be a part of these hard working people’s lives and to be a small platform for them to dream, grow and flourish. We hope you take time to learn about these incredible makers and shakers and join us at our upcoming events to support them.

Sam Wish

We love a good sugar scrub. And we’re downright obsessed with an essential oil mix that melts a bad case of the Mondays away.

You too? Meet Samantha Wishlinski, the Austin-based small business owner behind Sam Wish organic and all-natural apothecary products.

“Sam Wish originally opened in 2010 as a vintage and upcycled clothes store,” says Sam. “I was a stay-at-home mom to a new baby girl and wanted something fun and meaningful to do in my free time. In 2013, I became really passionate about my health and the health of my family. I was learning more and more about the toxic chemicals we were exposed to every single day via our home and body products and it absolutely shocked me. I decided to take matters into my own hands and started to make my all-natural, chemical-free body products.”

Sam Wish
Hazie Sue Vintage

Girl crush alert! We are madly deeply in love with Jackie Swain.

This vintage collector exudes sweetness and style. We first met the East Texas mom-of-two at our winter Summit when she was an attendee to learn how to grow her small business. She later joined us as a vendor at our spring show and the rest, as they say, is history.

Jackie owns Hazie Sue Vintage, a beautiful mint green mobile boutique that hawks handmade and throwback threads at Texas flea markets, boutiques and pop up events. Her fashions are festive and fun and her prices are so fair you will always leave the truck with a heap of new treasures from caftans and braided belts to 80s sequin tops and flattering 50s dresses.

We recently visited this girl boss during Canton’s First Monday Trade Days to learn more about her journey and small biz. Soak up her inspiring story and then save the date to meet her October 21st at our Dallas fall show!

Hazie Sue Vintage
M Street Studio

“I want my designs to work as hard as the people that wear them,” says Becca White, a 34-year old leather and jewelry artist.

Her company — M Street Studio — includes slouchy leather shoulder bags to gemstone and geode earrings that she designs and makes by hand in her Amarillo, Texas studio. Her luxury label sells readymade as well as made-to-order items for people looking for the perfect custom carryall from more than 100 leather options, varying strap colors and dreamy details from hand-stamped brass monograms plates to horsehair tassel accents.

“Making things that are both beautiful and functional is a driving force behind my design process,” says Becca. “It has to stand the test of my lifestyle before I will put my brand on it.”

Here’s a glimpse into the working mom’s daily routine and creative process. Meet her in person October 21st at our Dallas show!

M Street Studios
M Street Studio
three hearts apparel vendor stories
flea style stories three hearts apparel

Motherhood changes everything. For Linda Trieu, it not only brought a cute baby boy named Eden into her life, but a business too.

The 36-year old former litigation paralegal spent her maternity leave searching for precious products for her new bundle of joy. She found boy stuff hard to find — especially bibs to fit her son’s chunky neck size — and took the matter into her own hands making bandana bibs during her time off.

She enjoyed shopping for fresh fabrics and materials and eventually dipped her toes into making teething products and pacifier clips as her maker skills solidified. Today Three Hearts Apparel includes leg warmers to chewable necklaces and is the Houston-based mom’s full-time job.

Learn more about how Linda made the pivot from attorney to entrepreneur and meet this sweet maker in person at our Houston show November 18th. And this month, purchase a pacifier toy or clip and the brand will donate $4 to Hurricane Harvey relief!

full story here three hearts apparel
flea style luna antigua vendor stories

Sandra Falcon and Pamela Lozoya have talked fashion since they were grade school friends growing up in Chicago. Both of their families moved to Fort Worth during their pre-teen years and their friendship became stronger than ever as they put down roots in Texas. Today the Fort Worth moms are raising their own children together as well as a budding company called Luna Antigua. The fair trade online boutique offers beautiful fashion items for kids and women while empowering and supporting female artisans in Guatemala.

“All of our pieces are sustainably made and individually curated,” say the co-founders. “Our hope is that women and children will wear Luna Antigua with pride, knowing that they are a part of a positive movement and that they are helping keep this art form alive.” Learn more about these stylish businesswomen and meet them October 21st at our Dallas show!

full story here luna Antigua
three hearts apparel vendor stories
flea style stories ramble apparel

We met Hope Tarin at our winter Flea Style Summit this year when she helped her husband Justin set up his branding workshop hosted by his company Visual Playground. We had no clue that the 26-year old entrepreneur and stay at home mom was growing her own business, too!

“I knew I wanted to be an entrepreneur, I knew I wanted to create something from the ground up but had no idea what that was,” says Hope, who has a fashion merchandise and marketing degree. “I went through three rounds of ideas before Botanicool stuck.”

Botanicool is an affordable potted succulent company that offers small long lasting plants pre-planted inside cool portable pots with sleek wood shapes or bold graphic wraps for the modern millennial.

“I was not a fan of clay pots or drift wood, and even glass terrariums,” she says. “So I thought to myself “I’m creative and artsy why don’t I just make my own planter?”

Learn more about her budding business and all the tips you need to keep your plant lady goals green. Bonus: Meet Hope at Summit on September 23rd when she teaches a succulent workshop during our Office Style session (guests get to take home their cool creations!) and also at our Dallas fall show October 21st at her beautiful booth.

full story here botanicool
flea style stories ramble apparel
flea style stories ramble apparel
It’s hard to watch businesses take off and not want your idea to skyrocket from launch. But solid brands take lots of time and it’s usually the ideas that take a crawl, walk, run approach that last and succeed.

Kathryn and Ryan Hager are shining examples of this model. The couple own Ramble Apparel, a printed clothing label they design and create out of their Wichita Falls retail shop LITTLE h CREATIVE.

Kathryn left her salary gig three-and-a-half years ago to focus on the company full time after working in the couple’s garage for years after hours. A year later they leased a store to hawk their handmade goods (and a year later saved up to buy the building). Currently, the business only sells their stuff from their store and small shows and markets — such as Flea Style this fall — but is working towards gaining wholesale accounts and increasing their online presence to reach customers beyond their small hometown.
Here, Kathryn walks us through a typical day for the budding business and gives us a behind-the-scenes look of how they are pouring the foundation for a solid apparel and retail company from rural Texas.
full story here ramble apparel
flea style folklore baby and kids vendor stories

While in Houston last year we met Stephanie DeLeonardis of lovecraft. Jewelry Designs. We fell in love with the tiny spitfire. We boogied on over to her home studio while in town to see where she pours her heart into forging one-of-a-kind necklaces, bracelets, earrings and more from rare and unusual materials such as bone, claws and teeth.

full story here Lovecraft jewelry designs
flea style folklore baby and kids vendor stories

Dallas moms Gisa Marsicovetere de Heinz and Susana Arce were set up by their husbands. The men used to work together and upon learning that they both married Latin American women they knew their spouses needed to meet. The date proved to be a match made in small business heaven. Today the women own Folklore Baby & Kids, a stylish clothing and fashion accessory label for littles made from beautiful textiles and materials from their home countries. We sat down with the business partners to learn about their startup, struggles and how they juggle it all with three kids in tow.

full story here folklore baby and kids
flea style vine and branches vendor stories

Kellie Rode is a testament of reinvention and an entrepreneur that follows her heart. In the late 70’s, she studied interior design at The University of Texas and soon thereafter worked in the field selecting finishes for the City of Dallas’ buildings and airport terminal waiting areas. In 1980 she got married and started her own interior design business. For 14 years she had residential design clients off and on while raising her two children. She loved making jewelry and did so as a hobby until 2004 when she started selling her simple, earthy, handmade designs at small shows and holiday bazaars.

Today she takes on an occasional interior design project but mostly crafts jewelry from her empty nest. She makes everything by hand from firing bronze clay to tumbling pieces to simmer down the metal’s shine. We invited Kellie to the office to show off her process, pieces and inspire creative thinkers — and recent empty nesters and baby boomers! —  looking for a fulfilling part-time job.

full story here Kellie rode designs
flea style vine and branches vendor stories

We first met Anna Swanson last year at our Houston show. The 42-year old Austin native captured our eyes with her signature big brushstroke and collage artwork.

This summer, we reached out to the working mom to see if she would collaborate with us on some exclusive art prints for our online shop. Together, we discussed some ideas of what we liked and what we thought our shoppers would be drawn to (no easy feat with all of her pretty pieces).

We landed on four prints: Two abstract vibrant leaf designs and a pair of blush cactus collage pieces. We hope you love these works as much as we do and help us support this talented artist and teacher.

Meet Anna in person at our Houston fall show November 18th and visit shopfleastyle.com in the meantime to score your favorite exclusive print — or prints! — now.

full story here Demi + Olive
flea style vine and branches vendor stories

“The word girlboss is used a lot these days. But Caroline Burchett is definitely one of them. The McKinney, Texas mom of two handcrafts simply beautiful wood signs with uplifting words. She started the company in August of 2013 when the twins were ten months old. Nearly four years later her company has exploded to include 58,200 Instagram followers, a busy Etsy shop, sold-out social media sales and a a collection for Hobby Lobby.”

full story here vine and branches

“Sabon Home has been an evolution, it wasn’t about the money, it was about the fulfillment ~ so I really didn’t put any expectations on what I was doing and just let the wind blow me wherever it would take me.  Started with a blog on Tumblr and gathered tons of inspiration from Pinterest… thought I would only sell online, now I love doing shows, we are going to be going into a retail booth, can’t wait to see what’s next!!”

full story here sabon home

“Flea Style started as a total passion project. I grew up in Southern California combing swap meets and antique malls with my interior decorator mom. I moved to Dallas to attend SMU and worked at The Dallas Morning News as a lifestyle reporter post graduation. A few years later I moved to New York City and was a freelance reporter for Forbes, Lucky and more. While in New York I lived in Hell’s Kitchen and the longstanding Hell’s Kitchen flea market was a couple blocks from my doorstep. I visited it every weekend I could to buy things on my tiny writer’s budget to decorate my apartment. At this time the Brooklyn Flea was really revving up and I saw that more people were shopping the way I had always loved to shop. When life brought me back to Dallas a year later, I really craved those weekends perusing the Hell’s Kitchen flea market and saw the need for something similar in Dallas. I had several artist contacts to start it from my writing days, I just needed a venue. I called a publicist friend that represented South Side on Lamar about my idea and she talked to the owner and he gave me the space — and my start! A few months later I hosted my first Dallas Flea and have slowly grown the company to where it is today.”

full story here sabon home
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